FAQ related to breastfeeding

MyMomsBest is an online community of nursing mothers whom have many years of breast-feeding experiences. In our e-group, we often receive many frequently asked questions (FAQs). On the following pages, we will share the tips and advices from the mothers to the mothers. (Please note that these are information provided by the mothers. You are advised to confirm the facts with your respective medical care-givers like paediatricians, lactation consultants and others.)

Credit : These FAQs are patiently compiled and professionally edited by Jini, one of our member. Some of the wonderful suggestions and tips are provided by breastfeeding moms themselves. These are valuable tips which sometimes can’t be found even in books.

Questions related to breastfeeding

Is it normal to have my baby nursing up to 3-4 times at night?
• How do I continue breastfeeding when I return to work after confinement?
• What is a good breastmilk expressing schedule?
• I’m too busy at work to express properly. What do I do?
• What is reverse nursing?
• I am unsure of the nutrition value in the breast milk after a year. Do I have to supplement with formula milk?
• I’m breastfeeding my child, and now I’m pregnant. Do I stop breastfeeding?
• Can I breastfeed if my nipple is short or inverted?

Is it normal to have my baby nursing up to 3-4 times at night?

That is what we call reversed nursing, where baby wakes to nurse more often at night. This usually happens to nursing mothers who are working, as they are not around during the day and direct breastmilk then is limited. It is very important to learn to nurse while lying down. This way both of you would not miss any sleep.

My ds is now 20 months and still nurse a few times. I especially notice the early morning before I get up for work – somehow he knows the time. During the night, whenever he cries, I just let him latch on, I don’t even know how long that is as I fall asleep soon after. The next time he cries, I just switch to the other breast, if I remember.

Breastfeeding is not only for the nutrients but it’s also for comfort, security and the bonding that babies can’t get from bottled EBM during the day. The night feeds are also important to ensure your milk supply – this stimulates your breast to produce milk.

I have known mothers who don’t sleep with their babies or only nurse them once at night, and they have very poor milk supply. It is a sacrifice we have to make when we have to work and yet want the perfect food for our child – best of both worlds?

I normally lie down to feed my baby when I am home, I can either take a short nap or watch TV (I have a TV in the room and it’s good to relax your mind). This way, I ensure that I have enough rest – milk supply will be poor if the mother doesn’t get enough rest, stimulation (direct feeding) and water. By nursing lying down, I will have satisfied the first two conditions.

Between my dd#2 and ds, I have had only 6 months of undisturbed sleep (with ds in tummy) and I miss the child sleeping beside me – the emptiness. I like hugging my children, nursing or not – the feeling of them being so close, the warmth that I know I will definitely miss when they grow older or when they are weaned. Appreciate this time, for there will be a time when they would prefer their friends more than you! – Anna Teoh, Mama to Alison (9yo), Audrey (6+yo), Arrick (20 mths). www.blessedmums.com

Post Author: lilian